Category Archives: Funeral Home

funeral home in Penn Township, PA

Ideas for Niche Funeral Tributes

Your lost loved one was incredibly unique. How can you commemorate exactly what made your lost loved one so special at the funeral home in Penn Township, PA? Modern families often seek ways to make a service more personalized for the deceased, such as honoring what made the deceased special by celebrating their interests or hobbies.

The service should be just as unique as the person it’s honoring. Take this list of niche tribute ideas as inspiration so you can plan a personalized service to honor and remember your lost loved one. Did your lost loved one like golf? You can easily celebrate golf! If your loved one was a golfer, there are many ways you can include the golfing theme as part of the service, from having the service at the country club and setting out their golf bag as decor to setting up a golf memorabilia table with scorecards, collectibles, photos, and more.

Don’t forget about gardening. Flowers and other plants are always welcome at services, especially if the deceased loved to garden. Celebrate their love of gardening by filling the service with flowers, giving guests seed packets, displaying a casket or an urn with a flower motif, or using a memorial tree urn or casket to bury the remains. Did your lost loved one enjoy boating or being out on the water? Celebrate that interest with boat-themed touches at the service. For example, you can have the service at a beach or dock, or even on a boat. You could also play tracks of ocean waves, display boat models, or display a large piece of sail cloth for attendees to sign or notate memories of the deceased.

There’s also antiquing! Many people get into antiquing as an expression of their love of decorating, the enjoyment of the style of a particular era, or as a fun way to make a little side of money as they discover, fix up, and resell antique furniture and collectibles. If your loved one was into antiques, showcase the hobby at the service by creating an antique scrapbook or decorating the space with some of their favorite pieces. What about photography? From snapsfuneral home in Penn Township, PA on a smartphone to old-school photo shoots, there are many ways to be interested in photography. Similarly, there are many ways to celebrate the life of someone who loved photography, like displaying pictures the deceased took, playing a slideshow of their work, or encouraging attendees to snap photos and share them. Who doesn’t love fishing? If the deceased was a big fishing fan, celebrate that in the service by serving fish at the reception, donating fishing kits to local charities in honor of the deceased, or displaying photos of all their great catches.

We are here to help if you want more information on planning unique services with niche tributes or Penn Township, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss or preplanning.

funeral homes in North Versailles, PA

The Meaning of Common Funeral Home Flowers

From weddings and births to deaths and funeral home services, flowers have a rich tradition of symbolism in many important life events. Have you ever wondered about the significance of common flowers brought to funeral homes in North Versailles, PA? Keep reading to learn what common flowers represent so you can choose the perfect bloom to bring to a funeral, memorial, or any other kind of service after death.

To begin, you can try tulips. Tulips are generally spring flowers, harkening thoughts of renewal and rebirth. However, these flowers can also be associated with forgiveness worthiness, and love, making them ideal for use at a funeral or memorial.

Lilacs, like lilies, often signify youth and innocence. This symbolism makes lilacs a common choice for the funeral or memorial tribute of a young person or someone who had a childlike nature or good heart. With their signature floral scent and youthful appearance, lilies signify purity and innocence. They are often brought to funerals and memorials to represent the idea that the deceased’s soul has become peaceful and innocent in death or that the deceased will be reborn in a new life.

There are also gladioli. The gladiolus flower is very common for funerals and memorials as it symbolized strength, moral integrity, and faithfulness. What about orchids? Orchids are recognized as symbols of everlasting love all over the world. Perhaps this idea comes from orchids’ rarity or maybe from their incredible beauty. But no matter the reason, orchids are always a great choice for a funeral or memorial service to represent your everlasting love for the deceased.

You can’t forget about roses or forget-me-nots. Simply put, roses symbolize love. While different colors of roses have other meanings, the most common theme is one of love. White roses are very common at funerals because they represent rebirth and renewed love as well as pure love. Like their name suggests, these flowers are all about remembrance. Forget-me-nots signify lasting love for the deceased and the idea that the love will always live on in your memories, heart, and mind. This symbolism makes these flowers ideal for funerals and memorials.

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Like many flowers, carnations come in different colors. Each color has a different meaning. For example, red carnations depict admiration, white connotes innocence and pure love, and pink carnations convey remembrance. In the United States, chrysanthemums sometimes called mums, represent the truth. But in parts of Asia and Europe, these flowers represent death, mourning, and grief and are therefore only used at funerals and memorials. What about camellia? With its delicate petals and soft scent, the camellia is a perfect representation of excellence, refinement, and perfection. These flowers are often brought to funerals and memorials of someone respected in their community. There’s also the hibiscus. Often thought of as a feminine flower, the hibiscus symbolizes delicate beauty and fertility. Therefore, its often used at service for beloved wives or partners. Because of its prominence in several island cultures, the hibiscus can also signify an association with Hawaii or Haiti.

We are here to help if you want to learn more about memorials, funerals, or North Versailles, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today.

funeral homes in Monroeville, PA

Death Positivity and You

When you think about funerals or cremations, you most likely picture somber, dark rooms full of grief, formality, macabre moments, and feelings of loss. Like most, you probably associate death with negative feelings and thoughts. The death-positive movement, however, seeks to accept death as a natural part of life without treating it as taboo. Keep reading to learn more about the death-positive movement and funeral homes in Monroeville, PA.

Now gaining popularity around the world, the death-positive movement is thought to have first been derived from the work of anthropologist Ernest Becker in his 1973 book “The Denial of Death.” The term “death positive” was later created by coined by author and mortician Caitlin Doughty, who was heavily influenced by Becker. The movement centers around the concept that, as death is a natural part of life, we need to be comfortable with talking about, planning for, and generally accepting death.

The movement’s leaders give examples including having honest discussions with loved ones and family about the process of dying, what happens to bodies after death, death rituals and traditions, options for burial, funerals, body disposition, and ceremonies to honor a person’s legacy. No matter how or what you do as part of the death positive movement, its main idea is that if we talk about and approach death from an open and honest place, we won’t be so afraid and anxious about it.

The death positivity movement also believes in the incorporation of meaningful rituals and ceremonies into the activities surrounding death. Science has shown rituals such as eulogies, readings, songs or singing, donating a body to science, or even the simple act of burial or cremains scattering offer closure, aid in grief, and lead to healthier mourning. Modern generations are very uncomfortable with death and dead bodies. However, the positive death movement believes that personally taking care of a loved one’s body after death results in open and healthy grief. They also believe green or natural burial options should be available for all. Natural burials are when the body or cremated remains are buried without embalming or a shroud and in a simple pine casket or cremation urn. This does necessitate a quick process after death, but it is most similar to how our ancestors lost and grieved.funeral homes in Monroeville, PA

Family-centered funerals should be the norm. Instead of being written in a will or discussed after death with a funeral director, end-of-life wishes should be openly and honestly discussed with the family. This encourages positivity and normalcy around death and also helps ensure the deceased’s final wishes are carried out. The idea that hands-on participation in the service, body preparation, and burial or cremation can be healing is another core death positivity belief.

We are happy to help if you want to learn more about the death positivity movement or have questions about Monroeville, PA funeral homes. Please call or visit us today for more information on what we can do for you in your time loss or preplanning.

Penn Township, PA funeral homes

Funeral Home Trends

A new year will certainly bring new trends in Penn Township, PA funeral homes, cremation services, memorials, and more. How will the changes and challenges of the past year affect the funeral and cremation industry? Here is a list of funeral home trends for this year to inspire your planning and preplanning as well as provide interesting insights.

To begin, there will be a lot of virtual services and personalized services. Virtual funerals, wakes, and memorials became popular in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, we predict they will remain popular well into 2022 as virtual services offer many benefits from ease of scheduling to allowing out-of-town family members and loved ones to easily attend. Funerals have slowly been moving away from tradition and becoming more and more personalized to the deceased and their loved ones.

Unique, creative personalization of the funeral service has become the new norm. This means you’re free to choose the services, products, and traditions you want for the deceased’s funeral or memorial, whether that means hosting a celebration of life or putting them to rest in a cremation urn that will turn into a tree. What about memorial gardens or preplanning? A memorial garden is a community garden dedicated to the deceased. Oftentimes the dedication is made official through donations and made known through a plaque or a memorial bench. These gardens are becoming more and more popular as ways to remember the deceased and honor them for generations to come.

Preplanning or advance planning funeral arrangements is a great trend as preplanning offers many benefits including savings, reduced stress, more control over your own funeral, and the ability to plan a more personalized service. Direct cremation and at-home funerals will be popular, too. Direct cremation is when the body is cremated directly after death without any embalming, wake, or other services. Direct cremation is the most affordable body disposition method, which is perhaps why its gaining popularity.

Beyond savings, it also allows the family to hold a memorial, scattering, or any other kind of service whenever they want as opposed to right after the death. DIY is moving from home improvement to funerals and memorials. An at-home funeral is when the memorial or funeral service is held in the home rather than in an official facility. A home funeral cuts down many of the common funeral costs and can be much more eco-friendly, but there are still many benefits to hosting a funeral or memorial at a funeral home.

Unlike more traditional burials with embalming, heavily decorated caskets, and imported flowers, natural burials are all about keeping things simple. They use simple biodegradable urns, bamboo caskets, or cotton burial shrouds to minimize environmental impact and increase the speed of decomposition. As consumers, we’re becoming more aware of the effect we have on the environment. This has led to an uptick in sustainable or environmentally friendly funeral and cremation services like green burials, eco-friendly cremation caskets and runs, and a general increase in sensitivity surrounding sustainability and renewal after death.

We are here to help if you have more questions on industry trends or funeral homes in Penn Township, PA. Call or visit us today for more information.

funeral home services in North Versailles, PA

Buried at Sea

Have you ever been curious about burials at sea after funeral home services in North Versailles, PA? You might be surprised to learn that burial at sea isn’t just for sailors and pirates, but it does come with a lot of rules.

You can find the full rules and regulations for sea burials under the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA). It is important to note that sea burials are some of the most environmentally friendly burials possible, as they don’t use embalming fluid, don’t require a crematory fire, and don’t use up space on land. While the laws around sea burials vary from country to country and sometimes state to state, there are a few that remain the same almost everywhere. For example, all sea burials must be performed at least three nautical miles from shore and must be reported to the EPA within 30 days of completion.

Want more information? Here are some facts about burial at sea:

  • Are there rules for cremation burial at sea? There are two main ways to bury cremated remains at sea: in a biodegradable urn or by scattering the cremains. Biodegradable urns made for water burials float for a few minutes, then sink into the water and slowly disintegrate. Scattering cremains at sea can be done with a scattering urn or with your hands.
  • What happens when a body is buried at sea? A full body will float to the surface in three to four days, upon which it will begin to decompose. The bones will sink under the surface again in about two weeks.
  • Who can be buried at sea? Anyone! You don’t have to be a military member to be buried in a large body of water. The most common type of burial at sea today is the scattering of cremated remains, but a full-body committal is also an option
  • Are there rules for full-body burial at sea? Anyone from sailors to fishermen and oceanfuneral home services in North Versailles, PA enthusiasts can be buried at sea with a full body burial. According to federal law, a full body burial at sea can only be completed in an area that’s at least 600 feet deep and at least three miles from shore. Also, a licensed funeral director must be on board the vessel.
  • How do you hire a boat for a sea burial? There are two ways to request a burial at sea: through the Navy or through a civilian charter company. Navy sea burials are only used for sailors who died when a ship is deployed, and the family wishes for their loved one to have a sea burial. Civilian ocean burials are when civilians charter a private boat and hire a funeral director to come along and bury a loved one on the water.

We are here to help if you want to learn more about burials at sea or North Versailles, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today for more information on what we can do for you in your time of loss or preplanning.

funeral home service in Monroeville, PA

Creative Funeral Alternatives

Your lost loved one was unique, so why honor their life with a standard funeral home service in Monroeville, PA? Thanks to new technology, flexibility in tradition, and creative people, there are many ways to celebrate your lost loved one with a funeral alternative. 

Here are creative funeral alternatives to help inspire you, like donating to science. If your lost loved one consented, you can donate their body to science. This donation comes at no cost to you or your family and goes a long way towards advancing medicine and healthcare. Plus, donations often come with a free cremation. What about a celebration of life? A celebration of life is all about celebrating your lost loved one’s life instead of mourning their passing. Most celebrations of life include sharing memories, jokes, and anecdotes about the deceased to help remember the good times. 

Virtual services became popular in 2020 and 2021, but they’re not going anywhere because of the opportunities for creativity they offer. Not only does no one have to travel for a virtual service, but you can create videos, slideshows, and other digital additions to make the memorial special. What about cremains portraits? Professional cremains portrait artists will mix some of your loved one’s cremated remains with paint and create a special portrait of him or her. It doesn’t take a lot of cremains, but the portrait will surely be cherished by family and friends for generations to come. 

You could also do a scattering ceremony or make a memorial ornament. Scattering ceremonies are when you scatter or release your lost loved one’s cremated remains. There are many different ways to scatter cremations, from in the air or on the ground to in the water. From homemade personalized ornaments to custom, store-bought pieces, it’s easy to honor your loved one every holiday season with a memorial ornament.  

funeral home service Monroeville, PA

Go big with cremation fireworks or natural with a reef burial. Cremation fireworks take around three tablespoons of cremated remains, load them into a shell, and launch them into the sky. These beautiful displays are perfect send-offs for deceased who loved being the centers of attention. Did you know you can bury cremated remains in coral reefs? The cremated remains are mixed with cement and then placed in the reef. The cremains help nourish and build coral, contributing to the marine ecosystem and helping the deceased’s memory live on in nature.You can order a diamond made from your lost loved one’s cremains. The process uses about a half teaspoon of cremains, depending on the diamond size you want, and takes seven to 10 months. However, it’s well worth the wait to have a stunning memorial you can wear always. You can also plant a tree in memory of your lost loved one. Memorial trees are meaningful tributes that your family and friends can enjoy for generations to come. The memory of your lost loved one will live on for years. 

These are just a few ideas to inspire you for your loved one’s service. We are here to help if you want more inspiration or desire more information on Monroeville, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today. 

funeral home service in Penn Township, PA

Body Donation and Funeral Home

Body donation saves and improves lives all over the world every single day, and it is a common choice for before or after a funeral home service in Penn Township, PA.

There are several ways to donate your body. The first is organ donation, which is when someone donates their organs like heart, lungs, kidneys, or liver for transplant. Organ donation, depending on the organ being donated, can be performed when the donator is alive or deceased. If the donator is deceased, the organs must be removed immediately after death in order to remain viable. There is also tissue donation, when a deceased person donates body tissue such as skin, heart valves, ligaments, bones, veins, or corneas. The final most common type is full-body donation, or when a deceased person donates their entire body to science like a medical or scientific program for research. Body donation, no matter the type, is a noble, important act. 

Want to learn more about body donation? Here are answers to some of the most commonly asked questions: 

  1. How long does organ donation take? Depending on which organs are recovered, the procedure can range anywhere from four to six hours in length as the doctors must remove the organs as quickly as possible to keep them viable for transplantation.  
  2. Do organ donors get free cremation? Usually, no. After the medical professional completes the necessary donation procedures, they will call the funeral home to come pick up the body and perform the chosen final disposition. However, free cremation is generally included in full-body donation.  
  3. Are there extra funeral costs for being an organ donor? More work goes into preparing a donor’s body. However, most funeral homes do not charge extra out of respect for the deceased’s choice to save or benefit others through donation.  
  4. Can organ donors have an open casket? Depending on the type of donation, the deceased can still have an open casket. Funeral homes can hide any signs of donation, embalm, dress, and place the body in a casket.  
  5. Can I still be cremated if I’m an organ donor? The organ or body donation process does not have any effect on cremation.  
  6. Can you still have a funeral if you donate your organs? Yes! Body donation, whether organ or tissue, often has little to no effect on your funeral service plans. This is especially true if you plan to have a closed casket or choose to be cremated 
  7. How long do organs last after death? Harvesting organs or tissues is generally done within the first 24 hours after a death, but the sooner the better to maintain viability.  
  8. Will organ donation delay the funeral? On average, funeral or memorial services take place about a week after a death. Therefore, organ donation is easily performed long before any service takes place.

funeral home service Penn Township, PA

We are here to help if you want to learn more about body donation or Penn Township, PA funeral homes.

funeral home in North Versailles, PA

What Happens if You Can’t Pay for Funeral Home Services?

Funerals don’t have to be extravagant and expensive, but they do cost money. What do you do if you can’t afford a funeral at a funeral home in North Versailles, PA?

If you refuse to pay for a service, the funeral home is not obligated to take custody of a body. If a family does not or will not pay, the funeral home does not have to accept the body. If the funeral home already has custody of the body and the family refuses to pay, the funeral home will pause all funeral services and planning, store the body in the cooler, and charge the family a storage fee for every day the body is there. The funeral home as the right to refuse services and can transfer the body to the state at any time, but they cannot hold a body hostage in order to get payment.

Here are answers to common questions surrounding paying for funerals and cremation services:

  1. Are there free cremations or burials? If you cannot afford a burial or cremation, you can sign a form with the county coroner’s office and the state will bury or cremate the body for you. This will be at no cost, but you won’t have any say in where or how.
  2. How do you pay for a funeral with little or no money? There are many ways to cover funeral expenses, including low-cost options and fund raising.
  3. Is body donation free? Donating a body to research does result in a no-cost cremation. You can donate your body to science through institutions like medical laboratories, medical schools, and local hospitals.
  4. Do you have to have a funeral? You’re not required to have a funeral. So, if you can’t afford one, you don’t have to worry. You’re more than welcome to select a direct burial or direct cremation option (the most affordable final disposition services) in order to save money. But if you want to have a funeral or service, there are ways to do so without spending too much money.
  5. Can you get a funeral loan? Anyone can apply for a funeral loan to get help paying for funeral expenses. They are generally available through credit unions, banks, and online lenders.
  6. Who pays for the funeral if the deceased has no money? If there isn’t any money in the deceased’s estate, the next-of-kin traditionally pays for funeral expenses. If the next-of-kin aren’t able or don’t want to pay, there won’t be a funeral.
  7. Are there government bodies that help with funeral costs? There are several government organizations that can help with final disposition and funeral costs including Social Security, State Department of Health, Veteran’s Affairs, and even FEMA if the deceased died in a natural disaster.

funeral home North Versailles, PA

Take time now to preplan for your eventual passing, including how your loved ones will pay for your services.

Paying for a service at a North Versailles, PA funeral home can be stressful, but it doesn’t have to be. We are here to help if you would you like to learn more about preplanning or dealing with a recent loss.

funeral home service in Monroeville, PA

How Do You Decorate a Gravesite?

Personalizing your lost loved one’s graveside with decorations after a funeral home service in Monroeville, PA is a wonderful way to recognize their passing and celebrate their life. Keeping their grave beautiful can also go a long way towards helping you work through your grief and loss. Use these tips to help guide you as you decorate your lost loved one’s gravesite and honor their memory. But remember, at the end of the day, whatever décor you choose should be focused on the deceased and their life.

  • Think About the Season – A great place to start with gravesite décor is with the season. For example, create a Christmas or Hannukah decoration around the holidays or set up a pumpkin-inspired scene in the fall.
  • Choose Durable or Permanent Decorations – Don’t leave anything on the grave that will become dirty or damaged if left outside in the elements. Instead, opt for materials that are tough in the face of wind, rain, sun, heat, or cold.
  • Check Cemetery Rules – Most cemeteries have guidelines for what can and cannot be left on graves. Be sure to check with your cemetery before leaving any decorations.
  • Keep It Well Lit and Visible – Small items left on gravesites are often accidentally stepped on or destroyed by the cemetery caretakers. Make sure your items are either big enough to attract attention or well-lit.
  • Consider Faith and Culture – Another great way to find gravesite decoration inspiration is to look to the deceased’s faith and culture. Honor their heritage and beliefs with décor, and be sure not to leave something that would be offensive to their faith.
  • Consider the Weather – You want to avoid leaving something that will spoil in the hot sun during the summer, or something that will freeze and break during the cold winter. Think about the season and the weather when choosing your décor.
  • Come Back and Check – If you choose to leave décor on your lost loved one’s gravesite, be sure to come back and check on it regularly. Replace worn out or damaged decorations so the grave doesn’t become an eyesore.

funeral home service Monroeville, PA

While every cemetery will most likely have their own unique rules and guidelines for what can and cannot be left on gravesites, there are common items that you should always avoid using in gravesite décor. For example, avoid mylar or latex balloons. These materials are very dangerous for animals. Instead, try blowing bubbles, leaving garden spinners, or using biodegradable materials. Also, don’t put up a fence or blocker of some kind around the grave as it will prevent the employees from performing maintenance, and don’t use glass and it can break and cause injuries. Finally, avoid unsecured or lightweight décor. If the decorations won’t stay put, they could end up all over the cemetery, which is disrespectful to other mourners and causes extra work for the staff.

Do you want more tips on decorating gravesites or Monroeville, PA funeral homes? We are here to help. We’re honored to do what we can for you in your time of loss, so call or visit us today.

funeral home in Ponte Penn Township, PA

What Do You Know About Embalming?

Whether you’re having a cremation or a service at a funeral home in Ponte Penn Township, PA, it’s helpful to be aware of the basics of embalming.

Embalming is the preservation of human remains to slow decomposition and disinfect the body. The process is thought of as both an art and a science as it requires great skill and experience. Bodies are usually embalmed so they’re suitable for a viewing before a cremation or funeral service. They are also used to preserve bodies for medical purposes, whether for a laboratory or a medical school.

Embalming is frequently required by state law or funeral home regulations. Some states legally require refrigeration or embalming if a body is not cremated or buried within a certain period of time after a death, while other states leave the requirements up to the funeral homes. While the exact laws and regulations vary, best practices are to bury or cremate a body within a few days of death or embalm it.

There are two main kinds of embalming, arterial and cavity, but both are usually used in the standard embalming process. Arterial embalming involves removing the blood from the veins and replacing it with the embalming solution. In other words, the blood is flushed out of the veins and arteries by the fluid. Cavity embalming is when the internal fluids are removed with tools called trocars and aspirators. While each embalming expert might have his or her own preferred technique, here are the general steps of the embalming process.

funeral home Ponte Penn Township, PA

The first step is to wash and disinfect the body. The embalmer will also massage the arms and legs to ease rigor mortis and perform any necessary shaving. Next, it’s time to set the features. The embalmer sets the body’s features by closing the eyes and positioning the mouth. The eyes are often held shut by plastic caps and the mouth is usually wired or sewn shut. The next step is to inject the embalming fluids and cavity embalming.

An incision is made in the right common carotid artery and the right jugular vein in order to pump about two gallons of a formaldehyde solution through the body. As the solution is injected, it pushes the blood out of the veins and into a drain attached to the jugular. Bodily fluids and remaining gas are removed from the internal organs, like the bladder, intestines, and stomach, by a suction hose and a trocar. 

A trocar is an instrument with a three-sided point attached to a tube for removing fluids. After the fluids are removed, the embalmer injects embalming fluid to preserve the body and help it hold its shape. Finally, the embalmer then closes up any incisions made in the embalming process, gives the body a bath, and then dresses it. After about 24 hours, he will return to seal the incisions with a bonding adhesive to prevent leaks, apply makeup, and fix the hair. 

Do you have more questions on embalming or Penn Township, PA funeral homes? We’re happy to offer our expertise and compassionate services. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss or of preplanning.